Category Archives: Featured

Stage Left, Our Town, Our Church

stage

All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts, . . .
[As You Like It, Act II, Scene VII]

One can forgive a playwright for casting all of life as a stage.  Indeed, Shakespeare by so doing ended up revealing a psychology of human social interaction that is informative and helpful.  What role did you play today? What lines were you given? What improvisation did you make when interrupted by an audience member or by a misplaced prop? What kind of entrance did you make this morning, grand?  Quiet?

Every Sunday we of  Riverside Baptist Church worship in an auditorium at a local middle school.  It has a stage with a beautiful burgundy curtain. The chairs squeak.  The sound reverberates against hard walls, making the speaking and singing parts at times difficult to hear. But you recall middle school and plays don’t you?  How exciting it was to work for the first time on a theater crew, arranging the moving parts of scenery and stage; how tense for actors to remember their lines and for singers to sing in tune; and how delightful to play one’s role before parents and family and friends.  To say that each Sunday we “play” at church is not flippant, but is as profound as Shakespeare’s keen insight into our daily lives that unfold into Acts, scenes and exits.

Like the Pulitzer Prize winning play, Our Town, we begin with the Stage Manager making announcements and orienting people to the surroundings, helping the audience to transition from “audience” to the role of “congregation” and this occurs just after the stage crew has covered a simple plastic table with a cloth, placed  flameless battery-operated candles on it, along with a chalice that was made by a local potter in our last service in the building that used to stand on the corner of 7th & Maine.   As Thorton Wilder has the Stage Manager say, this is Maine Street (our Maine is named after the state) and this is Our Town.  And our “sanctuary” now is a middle school auditorium and the props include school paraphernalia collected in corners, school signs and wide hallways with their shiny floors.  As with any play, whether or not you can see the world through the thinly constructed scenery depends on your own imagination and willingness to look into and through your own life.  Charles Isher, writing for the New York Times wrote about Thornton’s play, “Wilder sought to make sacraments of simple things. In Our Town he cautioned us to recognize that life is both precious and ordinary, and that these two fundamental truths are intimately connected. “

This he could have written about Our Church.  When you drive down Maine Avenue in SW these days, you’re likely to be distracted by cranes, large trucks, unfinished buildings being pieced together and flagmen.  But along that avenue is a rippled roofline of Arena Stage, a beautiful and provocative building that dominates the skyline and by its transparency invites any and everyone in to view a stage, a play, and their life.   But it’s not the only stage in town.  Just down the road in a brick middle school, an audience gathers weekly to learn lines, sing interludes, make gentle entrances  and courageous exits.  Indeed, we “make sacraments of simple things.”  Every week, each Sunday, 10 a.m. just off of Maine.   ~Ladies and Gentlemen, See you Sunday ~

ministers_pray

Sabbath-Keeping As Resistance

The third commandment given to Moses and the Hebrews was, Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy 

We are instructed to hallow that day and to remember that God created the worlds and that God liberated the Hebrew slaves out of Egypt.  It is a day of truth-seeking and a time to cultivate covenantal bonds of human dignity and worth. By remembering the Sabbath and hallowing that day, we signal to the world that our commandments come to us via the fountain of life and we are made in the image of God, thus it behooves each of us to live justly, uprightly, and mercifully.

So many of us are stunned by the first three weeks of a new President that has thrown the country into chaos, diminishing our institutional checks and balances, promoting his family’s business from the sanctity of the White House, promoting inaccuracies of all kinds and threatening to destroy politicians who oppose his policies.  What to do in such a time?

Keep the Sabbath.  Hallow the day of rest.  Join in with your brothers and sisters in worship. This is resistance of the subtlest and most profound kind.  Your allegiance is to the King of the Universe, not an earthly prince.  Your strength is renewed and your heart recharged for living a just life.  Your mind is rekindled, the kindling of lies and suspicions and hatreds burned by the fire of truth and of the Divine.  ”We” comes into being.  We  march in the light of God, as we sing on most Sundays. We gather around the table of Christ and give our hearts to the Good Shepherd and to one another.  This is resistance. Here is a source for courage and strength.  I hope to see you Sunday. We need you.  And you need us.  Sunday then.  We hallow the world.  We resist.

Douglass_portrait

Mr Trump Meets Black History Month

February 2nd the President seemed to imply that Frederick Douglass is still alive.  I suppose we can be grateful he knows the name of the lion of Abolition.   This is an educational opportunity not only for the President, but for our country.  February is Black History Month and we have just had illustrated for us in a vivid way why this month dedicated to the struggles and accomplishments of African-Americans is still so very needed.

Speaking of opportunities, I want you to be aware of a play being hosted by our friends at Temple Micah and performed by Mosaic Theater, The Gospel of Loving-Kindness.  Here is what Rabbi Zemel shared with me about this opportunity:

Last year Mosaic Theater ran a production of the “Gospel of Lovingkindness,” a powerful play that addresses gun violence and youth in a poignant, intimate way.  One member of our Gun Violence Prevention working group saw the play and thought it would be an excellent way to raise awareness in our own community.  So we got in touch with Mosaic, and they agreed to bring a traveling production (black box style, minimal blocking, no set) to Temple Micah this March, and to follow it with a post-show discussion, to help us connect with gun violence on a deeper level.  The performance will take place in our sanctuary and is scheduled for Saturday afternoon, March 4th, 2017.
 
One of our group’s primary goals has been to educate children and bring them into the conversation, whenever it is age appropriate.  We believe that this play is appropriate children as young as middle school, if they are accompanied by an adult.  We have also been focusing more recently on the importance of conversations and collaboration with other faith based communities, and we know we must work together if anything is to be done about the gun violence epidemic.  So we would love to partner with you in this endeavor and invite Riverside Baptist to be a part of the experience.  
 
The evening will end with havdalah, the ritual that brings the Jewish Sabbath to a close.  
 

Here is a review of the production from 2015.

This is an educational, interfaith opportunity to educate our youth and lead them to safety. Will you support this effort and bring a young person or youth?  If yes, please email the church or pastor.
Gospel (Temple Micah) 3

 

book_of_kells___folio_34r_by_nikeyvv-d5csebl

25th Anniversary Sunday of Pastor Bledsoe

This Sunday, February 5th, marks 25 years since Pastor Bledsoe was selected as our pastor.  This is  a significant milestone in the life of both pastor and church.  Join us for worship as the choir and soloists sing, the pastor speaks to the occasion and following the service his new collection of sermons, Safe Harbor, will be available for ten dollars.

Riverside has had long pastorates as a rule, though the minister prior to Pastor Bledsoe was here for about three years. Prior to that, however, Robert Troutman was pastor for fourteen years.  The institutional memory, the continuity and care through generations and over the life span of an individual member are all qualities of a “novel pastorate.”  Churches sometimes go through a revolving door of staff and when this happens, it can be a test to keep folks together. We are a church obviously that prefers longevity to a revolving door.  This does not mean we are not forward-thinking though. After all, we are in the process of building a new church on our corner and steering the congregation to meet the future of new opportunities that await our community as The Wharf comes online.  We are a Christ-Centered, Multi-Cultural, Inclusive, and Ecumenical church, rooted in historic Baptist principles of soul freedom and the priesthood of each believer.  Join us this Sunday as we celebrate this significant moment in the life of our church.

~See you Sunday (at Jefferson Middle School)

112810

Where is the Gray Wizard? Or, You Shall Not Pass!

So I was thinking of ghosts past on Monday evening,  after getting a notification on my phone from the New York Times that the President had fired the acting Attorney General.  I remembered Richard Nixon in particular.  Then Tuesday morning, I listened to a song from the soundtrack of Lord of the Rings: The King Returns. This in turn reminded me of my favorite scene in that entire trilogy.

It is the scene where the Gray Wizard, Gandalf, defied and shouted to the menace that sought to destroy him and his company of brave hobbits: “You shall not pass!” and as he pronounced that, he drove his staff into the stone pathway. Where in America is the Gray Wizard?  Where is the Republican statesman who will stand up to a presidency that is, in the conservative columnist David Brook’s words, “an ethnic nationalist administration?”   The cowardice and silence of the adults in charge is deafening.  Senators? Congresspersons?  Where are you? It is time to save the nation now. Come out, come out wherever you are.

Monday night in my world religions class at Howard University School of Divinity, I explained the significance of Mahatma Gandhi’s satyagraha (soul force) for Martin Luther King’s non-violent resistance. You can read Dr. King’s explanation in the essay that appends his book of sermons, Strength to Love.  But I told my students, the present may now compel us all to relearn the idea of satyagraha.  Indeed, little did I know that the President would fire the acting Attorney General a few hours later.  The People must now face this nefarious threat to its democracy.

I know that some would accuse me of being political but I am speaking pastorally at this point because the reality is, the country is being  unraveled by a cruel man, a nationalist and bigot of the first order.  Not challenging him may lead to untold suffering and God forbid, death.  This President—remember this—this President did not confer with anyone in Congress about his executive order that deceptively established a religious test for immigrants and turned back refugees seeking safety.  You must ask yourselves then, with whom will he confer when he is tempted to send a nuclear device flying into and crashing a civilization?  Steve Bannon. That is the answer and that answer should rouse decent political leaders on both sides of the aisle to recoil in revulsion and then to stand up and draw a line and tell this President, YOU SHALL NOT PASS.

Statue-of-Liberty-crying-628x356

The Religious Test for Immigrants is Vile

Years ago I spoke to the horrific war in Syria and in particular, the destruction of Near Eastern Christianity.  We have witnessed the barbaric eradication of individuals and an entire culture not only in Syria but across the Middle East for the “crime” of being Christian.  Saying so does not, however, mean we are not sensitive to Muslims who are also killed and executed by radicals who claim Islam but destroy their own.  And saying so does not mean we agree with the new administration in its efforts to curb immigration by erecting not only a wall but a religious test to keep Muslims out of our country. That is a vile act.  It is not only an affront to the Christ but makes a mockery of the Statue of Liberty and its inscription dedicated to the huddled and tired masses of the world.  Saturday, January 28th, immigrants were placed in holding areas at airports across our country.  Persons with legitimate visas were barred entrance.  This is a dark moment in our nation’s unfolding history, but sadly not a new one.  The U.S. government rejected Jews because it viewed them as a national security risk.  President Trump issued a statement this week on remembering the Holocaust but didn’t even mention Jews, preferring instead to speak in general terms.  Coupled with his executive order that requires a religious test for entry into our country, the President displays either a glaring ignorance or an outright hostility to those who are not “Christian.”

Riverside has an experience with an immigrant who sought refuge in our country because their native land (in eastern Europe) is not safe for LGBT persons.  A couple in our church offered their home and safety for over one year.  Our church tried to bless this person both emotionally and spiritually and with some money now and then.  How blessed we have been to have this person in our midst!  How remarkable to watch this couple offer their home and support.  That, dear friends, is Christ in our midst and the inclusion of this person, providing a safe and welcoming space, is what America is about. Or at least it used to be.

Welcome the stranger. That is a biblical mandate in both the Hebrew and Christian scriptures. That is a ringing bell of liberty our country has rung throughout its history.  Protest the policy put in place by President Trump.  Resist.  To do so is American patriotism at its best. To do so is to practice the compassion of Christ.