Category Archives: Featured

seed2tree

Earth Day Sunday Ecumenical Tree of Life

Sunday, April 22nd, is Earth Day Sunday.  Many years ago, we provided an office for Dr. Jim Ball who had begun a venture I thought at the time was a fruitless endeavor, CreationCare.  His goal was to confront evangelicals with the truth of climate change and the biblical mandate to be good stewards of the earth.  Now, many years later, all I can say is, thank you, Jim!  Rolling Stone magazine identified him as a climate change warrior. So Riverside has had a stake in at the very least supporting efforts to educate and advocate for environmental protections. This Sunday will be another opportunity to reflect and take seriously the call to stop polluting the earth.

Joining us will be our friends from Westminster Presbyterian Church.  Co-Pastor Ruth Hamilton will be preaching in our service at Jefferson Middle School at 10 a.m. and then we’ll amble together to Westminster for a potluck, shared lunch (bring food to share, please).  Could it be that Riverside and Westminster are planting a tree of life in SW on this Earth Day Sunday?  I think so. In fact, I would say we are well on the way to doing that, having shared in a Christmas Eve Service just this past December and recently in a Maundy Thursday Worship together.  Westminster is so rooted in justice and community service and Ruth and Brian have been devoted servants in their church and our community. It is an honor to receive them into our worship this coming Sunday.  I hope you’ll join us to welcome them. And look, what we’re finding as we share is that we inspire each other, enjoy each other and through this fellowship we improve our community.  So this coming Sunday, join us for an Earth Day Ecumenical Tree of Life planting!

~See you Sunday

healing_hands

Tire Alignment, Soul Tread

Most folks who own a car, especially a used car or one they’ve driven a while, have come to that moment when a mechanic says “your car needs an alignment.”

I found this short description of alignment from the Bridgestone Tire page:  “Alignment refers to an adjustment of a vehicle’s suspension – the system that connects a vehicle to its wheels. It is not an adjustment of the tires or wheels themselves. The key to proper alignment is adjusting the angles of the tires which affects how they make contact with the road.”

Now I pastor a church. I don’t manage a garage but I’m grateful for those who do. Because when it comes to driving and maintaining a vehicle, well, I’m usually in over my head.  I’m thankful someone has the skills and knowledge to correct whatever it is that makes my car run less efficiently or poorly.  So why bring this up?

It’s Spring.  You’ve noticed that. The trees are blossoming all around us and we’re pelted by petals and pollinated at the same time.  It’s hard to miss the signs of new life around us.  So let me ask you how is your alignment? Wobbly?  Off kilter?  The potholes of journeying through the daily grind have you out of alignment?

Before Spring is past, why not ask yourself how your spiritual life and discipleship are holding out—you wouldn’t hesitate to put on new tread if your tires put you at risk.  You’d get that alignment to not only drive more efficiently but to safeguard your investment.

How’s your soul?  Try this:  find a place that is peaceful in or outside your home and take some deep breaths and close your eyes. Then chant or simply pray the Kyrie Eleison (Lord Have Mercy):  Lord, have mercy. Christ, Have mercy.  Ponder who you are and where you are and consider how a simple discipline of meditation in the week and worship on a Sunday might realign your soul and empower you to navigate the roads you travel down each and every day.  Maybe I’ll write about a dashboard bobblehead next time.  :-)

Grace, Peace, Hope and Love abide in your life this week.  If you want to talk about spiritual alignment, don’t hesitate to reach out to me.  ~See you Sunday

Cherry Blossom Marathon and Sunday Worship

smack-self-in-the-headOnce again the routine of Sunday worship is interfered with by another marathon.  Consult the Cherry Blossom Marathon Map for a quick look at how you may need to revise your trip into church. We anticipate a small impact on us. And for sure, we hope to see you in worship as Pastor Bledsoe preaches, “Here Comes The Dreamer,” a sermon that excavates our church history and its connection with the unfolding events of the assassination of Dr. King.

~See you Sunday

Oh, Freedom!

April 4, 1968: Keep Your Eyes On the Prize. Hold On.

This week is a watershed moment in our nation’s history as we ponder the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., April 4, 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee.  While there are an array of things you can do on Wednesday to honor Dr. King’s legacy and life, I hope you’ll consider going to the nation’s Mall and stand with others who are calling on our nation to End Racism Now, sponsored by the National Council of Churches.

This is also a configurative moment in the life of our church, for Riverside Baptist Church had just completed its building and had set its first worship at 7th & Maine Avenue for Sunday, April 7th, Palm Sunday.  That service was cancelled in lieu of the rioting that broke out in the city, following the Dreamer’s death.  Fifth Baptist Church was reborn,  from a bustling white church of a thousand in 1957, to  a few handfuls of persons that had stayed after the urban “renewal” project in the ’60s; it slowly but surely became a bi-racial church at the behest of Rev. Frank Foster who, after ministering in the streets after those riots while pastor at National Memorial Baptist, came to Riverside.

Now in 2018, extrajudicial executions continue and those who carry them out are not held to account. Alton Sterling of Baton Rouge, and very recently in Sacramento, Stephon Clark was shot by police eight times in his back. He was unarmed. He was Black.  As the New York Times columnist, Charles Blow, notes, “These shootings keep happening because, on some level, America finds them acceptable, finds them unfortunate but unavoidable.”

We are a small church. Since 1968, we have moved toward being a church that is bravely actualizing the dream that all of us are equal and can find a way to live together instead of perishing together, as Dr. King would say.  We are vibrantly opposed to the idea that the worship hour must remain the most segregated hour in America. We are passionately engaged in embracing all of God’s children. And we have been marching and calling on our nation to honor Black Lives because they matter as much as other lives.  We obviously have a long way to go.  The world needs a church like ours. We want to live up to that high calling. I hope to see you on the Mall on Wednesday. I will certainly see you at Jefferson Middle School for worship on Sunday.  Keep your eyes on the prize.  Hold on.

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Easter Sunday at Jefferson With Riverside Church

Join us for Easter worship service at 10 a.m. at Jefferson Middle School. The choir will be singing and Pastor Bledsoe will be preaching on the topic, “Why I Believe in God.”

Near the Wharf, we are easily located (see “contact and directions”) and across the street from restaurants and the piers.  Our new church building will be open this November but until then, come back to middle school and join us for a warm service where both heart and mind are engaged and where we speak truth to power for justice.   We are Christ-Centered, Ecumenical, Interracial, Inclusive.

~See you Sunday

The Holy in the Midst of the Profane

 

Jesus is flogged. Sculpture at the Sagrada Familia, Barcelona by Michael Bledsoe

Jesus is flogged. Sculpture at the Sagrada Familia, Barcelona by Michael Bledsoe

Journeying through Holy Week is also a journey through the profane.  If there is something “holy” then by necessity there is something profane.  Each term is identified by what the other is not.

I encourage you to take those salacious headlines about the profanation of the White House by its current occupant; take the rumors of war and the unyielding refusal of communities to hold accountable those who murder Black citizens (Sacramento and Baton Rouge only the most recent of a too-long list); take the suffering of the poor preyed upon by the hollow policies of politicians who cannot conceive that they might be called to hallow the world instead; take these to Golgotha. And of course, take yourself for all of us participate at some level in the ruin of the world.

We journey to the Holy while in the midst of the profane.  This is a stinging truth that culminates in the lynching of the Christ by Roman soldiers dedicated to the empire.  The consumer world around us spins toward Easter. We on the other hand travel with Jesus, to a solemn last supper, to a hill outside the holy city, Jerusalem, to a borrowed tomb.  Let us cry for our world, for ourselves and then by God’s grace, let us awaken on the third day.

Maundy Thursday Service is at 8pm at Westminster Presbyterian Church at 400 I Street. We will participate in a service of “stones of remembrance.”  I will be preaching and we will be joined there with Westminster and Christ United Methodist.  Easter Sunday we will worship at Jefferson Middle School at 10 a.m.  May we find our way to the Holy One this Holy Week. ~See you Thursday and Sunday