Refuge in a Profanely Violent World


Charred Cross, Coventry Cathedral

Charred Cross, Coventry Cathedral (Photo credit: SteHLiverpool)

The futility of human endeavors, polluted by profane and violent persons, is never clearer to us than in days like these, when nations war against nations and the leaders of pariah states existing within such nations prefer death to diplomacy.  The 100th anniversary of World War I is upon us.  1914.  This horrific war that introduced mechanized destruction and ruin still echoes through our histories.  Frankly, I have no idea why anyone would embrace what Christopher Lasch (in his book, The True and Only Heaven: Progress and Its Critics) would call “the last superstition”–the idea that human beings are gods and need only visit the self-help aisle in the local book store; that technology will save us; that progress is our telos, our inevitable goal and end.  That is as misguided an anthropology as I can think of.

Another way to say this is:  we enter the sanctuary on Sundays because we know we have participated in the ruin of the world; because the injustice and violence that consumes so much of the world is the result of a pathetic apathy with “the way it is.”  We know we need God’s mercy and grace to restore us.  Frankly, I’m surprised that there is any space for anyone to sit down in our sanctuary so great are the needs in this age, so desperate the longings and greed of the power-crazed, so frenetic our often pointless activity designed to keep us busy but ever failing to bring resolution and hope to our citizens.  Don’t be fooled—this landscape littered with the gods of ideology, blood-soaked by cruel and zealous practitioners of a Truth that only they possess—is not confined to the Middle East or to the Balkans, Ukraine and Russia. Our own government is captured by the most zealous and cynical politicians in a history that has known some very corrupt and profane congressmen.  As I said, I am surprised people are not lined up to enter a church that offers peace, refuge and a call to the love and peace of God in Christ.

Yes, the world is a wreck. That is not new.  Read the prophets.  Isaiah noted long ago that the earth staggers like a drunk.  My encouragement to you is, get yourself to a holy place, stand in the presence of The Other who is Just, ponder the revelation of God in the lowly and crucified Christ.  Pray for yourself. Pray for your world. And then when you’re finished praying, go back into the world and try to love it as Christ loved it.  Stop destroying and ruining the earth and its inhabitants.  May the love of Christ compel us to heal the world and those around us.  May the Holy remove what is unholy and profane in us.  And may we begin to see in the faces of others the image of God in which, we are assured by scripture, they were made.