Tag Archives: baptist inclusive church

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Westminster Presbyterian & Riverside To Share Worship

I pray that they will all be one, just as you and I are one—as you are in me, Father, and I am in you. And may they be in us so that the world will believe you sent me. ~John 17:21, the priestly prayer of Christ

This past Sunday, June 10th, was our last worship service at Jefferson Middle School. We are grateful for how wonderful the staff there has been to us and as well, for the hospitality of the DC Public Schools.  When we began looking for an interim worship space two years ago, we were turned away by institutions with whom we have a shared history in this community; declined because they feared opening their doors to a religious community; declined because they feared children in their building; but Jefferson opened its doors to us. Thank you! We wish the school all the best as it renovates its historic space.

In our eighteen months, we have kept together and supported one another.  We gave away $125,000 to about forty groups locally, nationally and internationally who help to heal the world and work for justice.  And needless to say, we have kept caring about each other and our community.  And with joy in our hearts, we watched as the steel frame to our church finally rose out of the ground. We are almost there…but not quite.

Beginning June 17th, our place of worship and our time of worship will change.  We will share not only space but we will share in worship with Westminster Presbyterian Church at 400 I St., SW.  We will worship at 11 a.m. And we will do this until we move into our new church building sometime in early November.  Again, we are grateful for the generosity and hospitality of our friends at Westminster. They didn’t have to open their doors to us but they have and not only opened them, but with a generous spirit have invited us in.  Our choir will continue to rehearse on Thursday evenings 6:30-8:30 but at Westminster (where we will join up with Kevin Twine and singers from Westminster).  The pastors and some interns and associates will rotate preaching duties. We will share communion together.  WOW.  I tried to anticipate as much as I could the various challenges and opportunities we would have but honestly had no idea that perhaps the most significant lesson we would learn in our wilderness interim journey is the ecumenical truth that in Christ, we are one. We are not only going to embrace that intellectually, we are going to experience it.

I urge you to adjust to this new situation and not forsake assembling together.  I urge all of us to joyfully step into this moment and prepare to be strengthened and renewed as we make new friends and deepen friendship with our fellow travelers at Westminster.  ~See You Sunday

A view of the steel frame from above at the Canopy Hotel.

O Happy Day: Topping Out Ceremony and Pentecost

Deacon Holley took the microphone to sing O Happy Day Sunday morning at the construction site and let go a torrent of joy. We had just worshipped on Pentecost Sunday, recalling the birth of the Church; were reminded of Jacob’s ladder that connected heaven and earth in a dream so vivid that when he woke up, he anointed the stone he had used for a pillow and named it Bethel, House of God; and then we walked over to the site of our church, presently in steel frame and concrete. It was a glorious moment with clouds finally lifted and the rain parted and stopped.  We had the opportunity to sign a steel pillar that HITT had painted white for us and then with markers, scribbled our names on it.  O Happy Day indeed!

Our “wilderness wandering” is not quite over, however.  After eighteen months worshipping in Jefferson Middle School (that was so gracious to us and provided us not only worship space but choir rehearsal space), we are now headed over to Westminster Presbyterian Church at 4th and I Streets. And how grateful we are that Westminster has opened their doors to us.  Our first service there will be Sunday, June 17th. Our worship time will change to 11 a.m. as we both, Riverside and Westminster, try to actualize what our Lord actually prayed we would do: be one.  A shared service is a remarkable opportunity to grow as Christians, to deepen our bonds of love, to share in ministry in our community and find ways, long after our interim journey is finished, to continue being an ecumenical fellowship.

As we adjust and overcome the challenges put before us, I would simply remind all of us what the write to the Hebrews urged 2,000 years ago:

11:24 Let us think of ways to motivate one another to acts of love and good works. 25 And let us not neglect our meeting together, as some people do, but encourage one another…

~See you Sunday

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The Appearance of Our Work and Our Dreams

Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for,  the conviction of things not seen. ~Hebrews 11:1

Since 2007, I have worked with our church leadership to research the possibility of development for the goal of financially securing our brave church, a unique Baptist Church that speaks boldly about civil rights, justice and equality.  After a decade of ups and downs, of intense work and meetings after meetings, we saw this past week the appearance of our work and our dreams. The steel frame is up. The concrete slab is poured.  The new church will be water tight in July and we’ll likely enter for our first service in November.  Hallelujah!

The view across the street at Maine Ave.

The view across the street at Maine Ave.

The view across the street at the corner of 7th Street and Maine Ave.

The view across the street at the corner of 7th Street and Maine Ave.

A view of the steel frame from above at the Canopy Hotel.

A view of the steel frame from above at the Canopy Hotel.

 

 

Two Kinds of Steel

steel_frame_day6Monday morning, April 23rd, the first steel beam was put into place by a crane on our construction site. By Saturday, much of the steel frame was in place.  We thank God for this progress and for the many workers who work tirelessly to construct our church.  The picture you see was taken on Saturday morning, just six days into the process.

Another kind of steel caught my eye this week.  The steel of character.  Let me tell you what I mean and the discovery of it was very exciting and joyful.

On Thursday morning I noticed that Google was honoring a 1948 London Olympian from the Netherlands, Fanny Blankers.  And clicking on that link, I noticed a Youtube film of the 1948 Olympics that is an hour in length.  I immediately thought of Riverside’s own Olympian, Emma Wright, who had grown up in Mississippi, and found her way onto the first American Olympic Team after WWII. She competed in the broad jump.  Emma was a gentle, kind, wonderful Christian woman.  And how proud we were and are of her!  So I began to watch this film from 1948 in hopes that I might see Emma.  Sure enough, the film begins with the processional of the athletes into the Olympic Stadium.  Late in the processional came the Americans and soon, walking across the screen, there she was!  A young woman, proudly representing her country and her family. You can see her in the photo below where she is second from the right.  I have made the photo black and white except for Emma.  How amazing to reach back into time and find this.  She possessed a character of steel. While she is no longer with us and will not walk into our new building in November, we nonetheless sense her presence and remember her. Tomorrow, Sunday, I will preach on “The Horizon of Expectation.” I’ll talk a little about steel and the future.  ~See you Sunday

Processional of American athletes in the 1948 London Olympics.

Processional of American athletes in the 1948 London Olympics.

Oh, Freedom!

April 4, 1968: Keep Your Eyes On the Prize. Hold On.

This week is a watershed moment in our nation’s history as we ponder the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., April 4, 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee.  While there are an array of things you can do on Wednesday to honor Dr. King’s legacy and life, I hope you’ll consider going to the nation’s Mall and stand with others who are calling on our nation to End Racism Now, sponsored by the National Council of Churches.

This is also a configurative moment in the life of our church, for Riverside Baptist Church had just completed its building and had set its first worship at 7th & Maine Avenue for Sunday, April 7th, Palm Sunday.  That service was cancelled in lieu of the rioting that broke out in the city, following the Dreamer’s death.  Fifth Baptist Church was reborn,  from a bustling white church of a thousand in 1957, to  a few handfuls of persons that had stayed after the urban “renewal” project in the ’60s; it slowly but surely became a bi-racial church at the behest of Rev. Frank Foster who, after ministering in the streets after those riots while pastor at National Memorial Baptist, came to Riverside.

Now in 2018, extrajudicial executions continue and those who carry them out are not held to account. Alton Sterling of Baton Rouge, and very recently in Sacramento, Stephon Clark was shot by police eight times in his back. He was unarmed. He was Black.  As the New York Times columnist, Charles Blow, notes, “These shootings keep happening because, on some level, America finds them acceptable, finds them unfortunate but unavoidable.”

We are a small church. Since 1968, we have moved toward being a church that is bravely actualizing the dream that all of us are equal and can find a way to live together instead of perishing together, as Dr. King would say.  We are vibrantly opposed to the idea that the worship hour must remain the most segregated hour in America. We are passionately engaged in embracing all of God’s children. And we have been marching and calling on our nation to honor Black Lives because they matter as much as other lives.  We obviously have a long way to go.  The world needs a church like ours. We want to live up to that high calling. I hope to see you on the Mall on Wednesday. I will certainly see you at Jefferson Middle School for worship on Sunday.  Keep your eyes on the prize.  Hold on.

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Easter Sunday at Jefferson With Riverside Church

Join us for Easter worship service at 10 a.m. at Jefferson Middle School. The choir will be singing and Pastor Bledsoe will be preaching on the topic, “Why I Believe in God.”

Near the Wharf, we are easily located (see “contact and directions”) and across the street from restaurants and the piers.  Our new church building will be open this November but until then, come back to middle school and join us for a warm service where both heart and mind are engaged and where we speak truth to power for justice.   We are Christ-Centered, Ecumenical, Interracial, Inclusive.

~See you Sunday