Tag Archives: churches in SW DC

Army Ten Miler, The Wharf, and Worship

riverside_new_building

Coming in the Fall of 2018, our new sanctuary

This Sunday morning, October 8th, is the Army Ten Miler race.  Click here for a map so you can prepare your travel plans into the District.

This coming week, The Wharf has its formal opening and there will be multiple activities and opportunities to see and experience the new SW.  On Sunday October 15th at 4 pm Pastor Bledsoe will participate in a blessing of the Wharf along with other SW clergy.  Our own Lauren White will begin the service as she sings Sam Cooke’s A Change Is Gonna’ Come.   Join us on the District Pier.

The center of our week is worship.  Please join us at 10 am each Sunday at Jefferson Middle School Academy in the school auditorium.  Pastor Bledsoe will be addressing our nation’s gun violence with reference to the assasination of President James Garfield.

Black-ribbon

Las Vegas and the Hollow Center of a Very Sick Society

Las Vegas now has its name listed amongst the other cities of massacres carried out by lone gunmen who, with but one weapon and a lot of ammunition, destroy a multitude of lives.  I have written so often in blogs about this that I can see no point in repeating what I have said on those other occasions.  Our society is very sick.  We should be alarmed. We should be rational and logical about how we limit access to these hideous weapons.  But we aren’t and we won’t.  And at the center of that hollow problematic is a wicked disposition desperately in need of a remedy and redemption.  Let me state that last sentence more clearly: the problem is deeply spiritual.  The remedies are simply mechanical and legislative but there must be a will, an intention to do what must be done to safeguard our society.

As you cross the threshold to enter the world, do so with blessing on your lips. When you cross the threshold and re-enter your home, do with thanksgiving and gratitude in your heart.  In the various decisions you make in a day—from how you greet someone to how you carry out your work—consider doing no harm and expanding the circle of friendship and kindness.  Join a community of the Spirit so your and my life might be hallowed, not rendered hollow.

Lord, have mercy.

Christ, have mercy.

We remember the perished and wounded in Las Vegas.

 

 

Ripple-Effect-400x266

Vexation and Belligerence

Listening to some Anglican chant on a youtube channel to which I subscribe, I came across the 143rd psalm and the 4th verse:

Therefore is my spirit | vexed with- | in me : and my | heart with- | in me . is | desolate.

I cut and pasted this from the text from which the choir sang it on that channel (ArchivesofSound).  I like that old English. “Vexed” is not a word we use very often but the vexation of the current political turmoil–the wholesale rending of the safety net, the belligerent rhetoric spewing from the White House and the drum beat of not just war but nuclear war–is a great weight on the shoulders of the multitudes.  Here is a more contemporary translation (NRSV):

So my spirit grows faint within me;
    my heart within me is dismayed.

A spiritual discipline that can infuse hope into your life; that rises above the belligerent, maniacal cawing of tyrants and politicians; that incorporates mercy and grace into the tick-tock rhythms of your daily life–that discipline is worth pursuing!  Pursuing peace we are less pursued by the harrowing tragedies and exploits of our world. We come to a moment such as the one that arises within this psalm of desolation, verse 8:

Let the morning bring me word of your unfailing love
    for I have put my trust in you.
Show me the way I should go,
    for to you I entrust my life.

Faith, hope, and love. Live fearlessly for we are shepherded by the Great Shepherd.  I hope you will begin or continue as it may be, your spiritual discipline and worship with us Sunday morning at 10.

balance

Balance: Turn Off the “News”

In Washington DC, the swirling currents of power and those who want it or those who attempt to live near it, threaten to overwhelm and diminish everything else.  It is difficult to maintain balance and perspective.

Reduce by half the time you spend watching the news.  I use “news” in its broadest terms as an entertainment product produced by a range of radio, print, and internet media.  Reduce the time you devote to that by half.

We have had illustrated for us in recent weeks how a hurricane can inundate every aspect of a person’s life.  The power, the devastation and ruin are so vast that persons living within that matrix are in danger of being swept away by the sheer number of issues and tasks they must undertake to regain their lives.  In such times, you must focus on the most immediate tasks that will insure your safety and health.  Find those few things that you must accomplish this week and then bracket out all of the other issues until such a time arrives that you can sort through them. And while weather reports are important (anyone who lives in a hurricane zone will have to keep an eye on the weather reports), watching those reports on the hour every hour will actually paralyze you.  Reduce your time watching reports to morning and evening and in between, get on with your life.

This is applicable to we who live in D.C.  There is an entire world that can be explored. There are other dimensions of your life that need and deserve attention.  The political vortex of “news” however can pull you in and deplete you of the joy of living in balance.

I pastor a church on the corner of 7th Street and Maine Avenue. Currently we are building a new sanctuary.  And as we do, we worship across the street at Jefferson Middle School.  Every Sunday, at 10 a.m., we dial down the noise and rhetoric and dial into the still, small voice of a merciful Shepherd. We sing, we pray, we live in the light of a greater Good.  Peace like petals from tree blossoms fall around us.  Dignity and blessing are handed out by hands and hugs.  If there is one thing in your routine that might immediately propel you out of the raging currents into a harbor of peace, worship is it.  ~See you Sunday, 10 a.m.

Irma_Orlando_radar

Fog Lights Through A Disaster

In recent days since Hurricane Irma wrecked much of Florida, I have been dealing on a very personal basis with that wreckage for my mother’s home was ruined by the storm.  I won’t go into those details but suffice it to say I’m learning some things along the way as I navigate this disaster.

A disaster is always personal even when it is regional  One way we naturally gauge disasters like a hurricane is by satellite images and radar or even drones that hover above the landscape and provide us a perspective of the breadth of a disaster. The depth of a disaster, however, lie at the deep level of individual lives. Their narratives are comprised of trauma, harrowing escapes and sometimes unutterable loss.

When the storm dust is in the air, use fog lights.  The first time I learned this lesson was as a child in the back seat of a car. My father was driving and we went down a hill and as we did, suddenly a storm of dust out of nowhere filled the air.  He turned on his lights so he could be seen (ever see folks ride through rain storms without headlights on? they think they can see, and perhaps they can, but we need to see you!) but my father also pointed out that persons headed our way had their bright lights on which filled the dust with light and blinded everyone.  Dim lights or fog lights are the best way to navigate one’s path through.  But of course, people turn on their bright lights and with that they turn up their volume, yelling and frantically lashing out in panic. Turn your fog lights on, turn down the volume and find the path out.

We are interdependent and rely on the kindness of strangers.  I hope the country can finally come to terms with a covenantal view of human interdependency and be done with the half-truths of libertarian and other conservative ideologies that extol the individual’s liberty at the expense of our biblically mandated obligation to care for one another.  The question is not whether or not people “deserve” our help–we all need the help of one another. Living selfishly, as the monk Thomas Merton pointed out, is living at the doorstep of hell.  My mother has now made two trips to two different hotels. This morning, as she drank her coffee in the free breakfast area of the hotel, a stranger helped her with getting some hot water and other items.  Kindness is a hand that lifts our chin. We are humanized by those kindnesses and when we are the ones offering the kindness then we are also humanized in the process.

Life is a storm.  The Buddha’s first noble truth is, life is suffering.  Christianity has at its very center the suffering (the Passion) of the Christ.  To live is to navigate storms and loss.  We all suffer.  For me, at this frantic time, I am doing my best to get to Sunday. Why? Because I know when I get to Sunday, I get to peace and communion with others, hymns of joy and prayers of sustenance.  I hope you can find an oar and paddle your way over to our safe harbor.

~See you Sunday

shelter_rain

Dignity in the midst of the storms

We pray for:

THOSE IN THE PATHWAY OF STORMS  We are especially mindful of all those who reside in Florida and Georgia and the Carolinas, the Bahamas and Caribbean who, at this moment on Friday,  seem to be in peril as Hurricane Irma makes its way closer to the United States.  And for those who were impacted by Hurricane Harvey in Texas and Louisiana.  Christ, have mercy.

THOSE IN MEXICO  We remember especially those in the state of Oaxaca and beyond who had family and homes destroyed.  Lord, have mercy.

DREAMERS  We pray for those children who have known only the United States and came here or were born here with families who had illegally entered the country but by no fault of their own were raised here and dared to dream they could be part of the American Dream.  This administration and the Congress seems prepared to do them great harm.  May it not be so.  Christ, have mercy.

FOR ALL OF US  We who toil day by day and attempt to do better by ourselves, our families and our communities are under great stress, carrying large burdens.  May these burdens be lifted and in their place may we receive courage and strength.  Lord, have mercy.

*******

Sunday I will be asking the following questions and I hope to give some guidance in my sermon entitled, “Superman’s Cape, A Clerical Collar and Clothed in Christ”:  How are you navigating this apocalyptic landscape?  How are you making sense of your lives as you daily wade through the swamp of political rhetoric, assorted hatreds, natural catastrophes, not to mention trying to find an affordable plumber on the week-end?  How are you living between sun up and sun down?  What strategy for maintaining your human dignity and the dignity of others do you have when the power goes out and the storm is raging around you?

Join us in worship Sunday at 10 a.m. at Jefferson Middle School.  Because there in that auditorium, we embrace each other as fully human. We carry one another’s burdens and share in each other’s joys.  ~See you Sunday