Tag Archives: churches SW DC

Eucharist

What I’m Learning at Westminster Presbyterian Church SW

Riverside Baptist Church @ The Wharf has, since June, been worshipping @ Westminster Presbyterian Church just down the road from our building site.  Since no leading celebrity or leader in either traditions has arrived to pat us on the back for this ecumenical experiment, I want to commend these two congregations and their pastors for the courage it took.  Mind you, not the courage to share a building because that is nothing new or brave. Churches rent space from one another all the time.  But when it came time to make an arrangement where we, Riverside, would worship next (after our interim experience at Jefferson Academy Middle School) and I approached Pastor Ruth of Westminster, we made a decision to share worship together.  THAT is POWERFUL.  And why is that so powerful?  Many reasons but let’s just cut to the quick and hear the prayer of our Lord as rendered by the Gospel of John in chapter 17:

20 “I ask not only on behalf of these, but also on behalf of those who will believe in me through their word, 21 that they may all be one.”

Many who seek a church do so without flinching in the face of the obvious:  churches are divided. And they are divided not only along cultural, racial and ethnic lines but their pastors and priests will not offer communion to those who are outside their flock or fold.  We may as well have erected barbed wire fences between our various communions. So when I sat in the sanctuary of Westminster Presbyterian on this past Sunday and received communion, I did so with a heart full of gratitude that we—whatever differences we may have—came to the Table of our Lord as ONE.  Do not let this slip past your gaze.  This is a powerful experience.  We could have been worshipping in the basement at a different hour and not shared our worship but we rejected that approach.  We believe in the gift of the unity of Christ. And we have been worshipping for a few months now as though we actually believe in those radiant words found in the Letter to the Ephesians (chapter four):

4 There is one body and one Spirit, just as you were called to the one hope of your calling, 5 one Lord, one faith, one baptism, 6 one God and Father of all, who is above all and through all and in all.

Mind you—we must mind this—our unity is not our accomplishment. This is God’s gift to us in Christ.  What Westminster and Riverside have done up to this point is simply to believe in that unity and live up to it and through it.  We have rejected the logic of “if…then” as the scholar of ecumenism, Michael Kinnamon, puts it.  You know, “if certain conditions are met then certain steps can be taken.”  Instead, as Kinnamon prophetically states it,  we embrace the Gospel logic of “because…therefore.” Because God loves us we are free to love our neighbor.  “In the same way,” he writes, “because we are one in Christ, therefore we are freed and empowered to seek common mind on those matters that have kept us apart.” [The Vision of the Ecumenical Movement].  To say we have no need of one another, Kinnamon reminds us, is a sinful denial of this unity that was achieved for us by the costly grace of Jesus Christ.  Westminster Presbyterian, I salute you!  Riverside Baptist, I salute you!  Let us worship together the One God who is above all and through all and in all.  Those who are weary of business as usual, with divisive and provincial notions of church and worship, we invite you to join us on Sunday.  ~See you Sunday as One people

By muralist Judy Baca

Worship As Resistance

Don’t you weary of reading the news every day through its various entertainment platforms?  There are few of us who would keep a window open if a bus was running outside spewing its exhaust or a jackhammer were pounding the concrete 24/7.  That would be a form of torture. My question for so many of us is, why are you subjecting yourself to torture?  Turn OFF the “news.”  Commend 45 to Almighty God, the Just and Holy.

People wonder what they can do. We march, we advocate for policy change, we denounce and post our opinions. And that is good and even needed. But if that is all you do day in and out, don’t be surprised when you’re constantly angry, nauseous, short with those you love and then crash and burn.  Because the spirit needs the Spirit.  My hope is this:  that you will commit 10% of the time you spend on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, the internet period toward worship. Worship as Resistance means you enter a congregation that loves others and is thus involved in creating the Beloved Community. Worship as Resistance means, you get your soul fed.  How many hours do you spend a week posting and reading online? I would say it is  a safe guess that you spend 10 hours.  That means 10% would be 1 hour in worship.  See you in worship tomorrow.  We have singers singing, deacons praying, we’re combined in worship with Westminster Presbyterian and are thus fulfilling the prayer of our Lord to be One, and we are replenishing our souls. Oh, and I’m preaching a cinnamon stick sermon.  ~See you Sunday

9068078579_6a65100ee1_n

You Have a Holy Book? You Have Issues

pier-perspective_1Like a perfumed letter from your mother that you keep in your wallet to remind yourself of her and because reading her words renders a presence of her; or like an old phonograph album, with its scratches and pops, that you play because that recording of that particular song or symphony is your favorite and you can still hear it despite the scratches; so is the bible.  It is not an infallible book dropped from heaven. And those who assert such a thing, name their churches after it, place it as a talisman on their coffee table, come close to bible-olatry.

Many of us are recovering fundamentalists or bible-olaters.  Some are not recovering but repress those attempts made by parents or churches to conform them to cultural norms dipped in the ink of the bible in order to give sacred stamp to what is at best traditional viewpoints and at worse,  oppressive measures to manipulate a person.  Take for example the report in the Washington Blade, “D.C. Church backs ‘shaming’ of LGBT people” of August 10.  Capital View Baptist of Washington DC apparently “adopted a revised church constitution last year that says, ‘shaming and shunning are acceptable Christian responses’” to LGBT folk.

Well, if you have a holy book, you have issues.  And here is the overarching problem:  the Holy is communicated through the lens and pens of human beings and cultures so that the person who reads a holy book must be diligent about sorting through what is culturally and historically confined and whatever Truth is being communicated.  One example is the church who encourages its members in homophobia.  It cannot reject pre-scientific views of human sexuality because it embraces pre-scientific ideas embedded in the text of their holy bible.  Mind you, that church is using electricity, its members make dental appointments instead of calling an exorcist and so on and so forth.   They cherry-pick the scriptures while munching on bacon, a food (pork) described in the bible as an abomination.  Another example is slavery. Another is the role of women.  Another is …

I invite you to identify examples and issues and join with me on Saturday August 25th in a walk & chat along the Wharf at 10:30 a.m.    We’ll meet at the end of the Recreation Pier (I’m calling this event Pier Perspective).  That pier runs perpendicular to Maine Ave. at 7th, SW.  We’ll have a nice time ambling about and talking for about one hour.  And I’ll pass along any insights I might have but especially encourage us to work out a method of interpretation so we can receive the Truth of the bible while not being entangled in views that dehumanize us.  I hope to see you Saturday!  ~PSTR

 

bike_path

Ride a Bike, Worship the Lord

Imagine opening a garage door and seeing a bicycle splayed out on the concrete, its various parts lined up across the floor.  There’s the handle bars over there and there are the tires separated from the rim that is lying beside it and so forth. Then imagine the owner of the bike telling you, this is what it means to have a bike.  What on earth could such a statement be telling us other than the owner of the bike has confused parts with the whole?

We live in this kind of age though where people think that you —YOU— can be explained by reducing you to your various parts or your blood chemistry.  But just as a bike is more than the sum of its parts (so that actually riding a bike and feeling that nearly inexplicable feeling of balancing on two tires and the breeze gliding across your face is the point) so it is with you.  You are more than the sum of your parts.  You are a living soul.

So imagine that garage door opening and then in a kind of backwards-winding of a film, you watch as the parts reattach themselves one by one until, wow, the bike stands before you.  And its standing before you is also a beckoning to you to ride it.

That dear friends is Church on a good day. When the church door opens and we cross over the threshold, we are not reduced to our various and multiples parts. Instead, we are put back together; we are reattached; we are re-membered.  And that experience of song-praise-prayer-proclamation is not so far removed from riding a bike and defying gravity and being engaged with the world around us in a remarkably different perspective than when we are standing on a corner waiting for traffic to stop or sitting in a cubicle answering a phone call.  It is invigorating and we are renewed because the truth is, you really are more than the sum of your parts.  In the midst of the congregation, you have transcended those parts and become part of the whole.  I hope you get on a bike this week.  I hope you’ll put aside the excuses for not attending church and get yourself into the congregation of those who pray, praise and proclaim the Truth of God’s abiding love for us.  ~See you Sunday

hand-in-hand_21071782

We Are One

This past Sunday Westminster Presbyterian Church and Riverside Baptist Church worshipped together and afterward shared in a potluck lunch.  We have worshipped together previously–back on Christmas Eve Sunday 2017, we were invited by Westminster to join them since we could not worship at Jefferson Middle School. And I was invited to preach. Then on Maundy Thursday of this year we shared in a service in the evening and again, I was invited to preach. So it was only fair that we invite Westminster into our interim space on a Sunday and their co-pastor, Ruth Hamilton, preached to us.

What a superlative experience!  Pastor Ruth’s sermon was brilliant, refreshing and spot on. Perhaps I’m gushing because I had the day off for preaching and could sit and listen but I heard other of our members remarking on how wonderful it was to not only hear Ruth’s sermon, but to worship together with a congregation that shares so many of our values and passion for justice and peace.

Our unity in Christ is a given.  We do not create that unity but God has accomplished this already in Christ.  It only makes sense then that we move forward in these coming days, weeks and months as people united, on the way to actualizing God’s love in our community, our city and our world.  I will be speaking with co-pastors Ruth and Brian in the coming days about how we do that.  We will pray and dream about how we worship together and how we share in mission.  I invite you to pray and dream with us. Finally, a shout out to our singers, choir and musicians! You made our Sunday very, very special.  ~See you Sunday

Cherry Blossom Marathon and Sunday Worship

smack-self-in-the-headOnce again the routine of Sunday worship is interfered with by another marathon.  Consult the Cherry Blossom Marathon Map for a quick look at how you may need to revise your trip into church. We anticipate a small impact on us. And for sure, we hope to see you in worship as Pastor Bledsoe preaches, “Here Comes The Dreamer,” a sermon that excavates our church history and its connection with the unfolding events of the assassination of Dr. King.

~See you Sunday