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The Patriot Organ Grinder


On July 4, 2016, I will give thanks for being a citizen of the United States of America, my native land, my country.  For its freedoms and ideals so beautifully stated in its founding documents.

I will also pray for the entire world where other citizens rejoice in their citizenship, love their country and admire their ideals.

It is not easy to tack between the right wing and the left wing on Independence Day.  I marvel that the Left can celebrate and fly the flags of other nations, particularly of nations either harmed by the U.S. or opposed to the U.S. but cannot take pleasure in their own nation’s flag.  Everyone has a right to love their country.  I marvel no less at the Right that insists that the United States is exceptional, so different from other countries as to warrant our absolute obedience despite whatever wrongs it has carried out in our names.

As a Christian, my ultimate allegiance is to Christ and the Kingdom of God.  I love my nation but I do so out of a critical engagement with its ideals and its practices. Right now, the Patriot organ grinder is churning out his relentless jingles, ginning up the passions and anger and fears of fellow citizens.  Christian Evangelicals have been captured by the Patriot organ grinder’s tune.  Below is an excerpt from Mark Twain’s autobiography when he reminisces about the nomination for President in the Republican Party of 1876, candidate from Maine, James Blaine.  Twain refused to support him though he was loosely affiliated with Lincoln’s Party.  His colleagues criticized him for not supporting the nominee.  Twain’s words are as prudent for our consideration today as they were then:

…I said: “But we don’t have to vote for him.” Robinson said “Do you mean to say that you are not going to vote for him?” “Yes,” I said, “that is what I mean to say. I am not going to vote for him.” The others began to find their voices. They sang the same note. They said that when a party’s representatives choose a man, that ends it. If they choose unwisely it is a misfortune, but no loyal member of the party has any right to withhold his vote. He has a plain duty before him and he can’t shirk it. He must vote for that nominee. I said that no party held the privilege of dictating to me how I should vote. That if party loyalty was a form of patriotism, I was no patriot, and that I didn’t think I was much of a patriot anyway, for oftener than otherwise what the general body of Americans regarded as the patriotic course was not in accordance with my views; that if there was any valuable difference between being an American and a monarchist it lay in the theory that the American could decide for himself what is patriotic and what isn’t; whereas the king could dictate the monarchist’s patriotism for him—a decision which was final and must be accepted by the victim; that in my belief I was the only person in the sixty millions—with Congress and the Administration back of the sixty millions—who was privileged to construct my patriotism for me.*

Happy Independence Day.  Tell the Organ grinder to go home. We are better than the tunes he plays.  ~ See you Sunday

*[Twain, Mark; Smith, Harriet E.; Griffin, Benjamin; Fischer, Victor; Frank, Michael B. (2010-11-15). Autobiography of Mark Twain: The Complete and Authoritative Edition, Volume 1 (pp. 316-317). University of California Press. Kindle Edition.]