Tag Archives: biblical transition

Models of Pastoral Transition

Pastor Bledsoe addressed in his first sermon back from Sabbatical, the examples of leadership transition with Moses and Elijah–both examples of an authoritarian style of transition where a leader selects his successor. This may never have been a “model” but an example. Indeed, it is not what we strive for in today’s analytical style of sorting through qualified candidates for any position.

Sunday August 18th, Part II of Biblical Models of Transition will be preached and we’ll look at the selection of the apostle who replaced Judas the Betrayer. You can read Acts chapter 1 and be prepared. Again, the question will be: is this a model for our church or any church to follow? You’ll have to show up and listen to the sermon to know what “this” is.

We are trying to sort through what, if any, biblical instructions there are for selecting the next pastor. How are we to be guided? But to put our process in a nutshell, perhaps we should simply become familiar with what our church constitution says should happen when a pastor resigns (retires). ” Vacancy – Whenever the office of Pastor shall become vacant, or be officially pending, without delay it shall be the duty of the deacons, in conversation with at least one of the Baptist conventions with which the church is aligned–the Executive Minister of the D.C. Baptist Convention, and/or the Alliance of Baptists and/or the American Baptist Churches, USA –to select a minister of the Gospel to fill the vacancy.  A Pulpit Committee of no less than five members shall be nominated by the Deacons and elected by the church in order to search out and present prospective candidates for the office.  … [Article VI.1.c]

Currently, our two boards have been meeting with a consultant, Rev. Paul Clark, and have led the congregation through listening sessions. Sometime in the early Fall, we should be ready to nominate and elect the search committee. What is YOUR role? You and I are to be in prayer, practice patience, be discerning and we ought each to ask ourselves what we are prepared to do in order to make any of our “wants” for the next generation of leadership to become reality. What will you support? What will you show up to do? Because the Church is not the pastor but all of us. Let us be guided by the words of the Apostle Paul to the church at Philippi: “be of the same mind, having the same love, being in full accord and of one mind.” The Good Shepherd is our First Pastor, our First Shepherd. Amen.