Tag Archives: ecumenical baptist church

Westminster Presbyterian & Riverside To Share Worship

I pray that they will all be one, just as you and I are one—as you are in me, Father, and I am in you. And may they be in us so that the world will believe you sent me. ~John 17:21, the priestly prayer of Christ

This past Sunday, June 10th, was our last worship service at Jefferson Middle School. We are grateful for how wonderful the staff there has been to us and as well, for the hospitality of the DC Public Schools.  When we began looking for an interim worship space two years ago, we were turned away by institutions with whom we have a shared history in this community; declined because they feared opening their doors to a religious community; declined because they feared children in their building; but Jefferson opened its doors to us. Thank you! We wish the school all the best as it renovates its historic space.

In our eighteen months, we have kept together and supported one another.  We gave away $125,000 to about forty groups locally, nationally and internationally who help to heal the world and work for justice.  And needless to say, we have kept caring about each other and our community.  And with joy in our hearts, we watched as the steel frame to our church finally rose out of the ground. We are almost there…but not quite.

Beginning June 17th, our place of worship and our time of worship will change.  We will share not only space but we will share in worship with Westminster Presbyterian Church at 400 I St., SW.  We will worship at 11 a.m. And we will do this until we move into our new church building sometime in early November.  Again, we are grateful for the generosity and hospitality of our friends at Westminster. They didn’t have to open their doors to us but they have and not only opened them, but with a generous spirit have invited us in.  Our choir will continue to rehearse on Thursday evenings 6:30-8:30 but at Westminster (where we will join up with Kevin Twine and singers from Westminster).  The pastors and some interns and associates will rotate preaching duties. We will share communion together.  WOW.  I tried to anticipate as much as I could the various challenges and opportunities we would have but honestly had no idea that perhaps the most significant lesson we would learn in our wilderness interim journey is the ecumenical truth that in Christ, we are one. We are not only going to embrace that intellectually, we are going to experience it.

I urge you to adjust to this new situation and not forsake assembling together.  I urge all of us to joyfully step into this moment and prepare to be strengthened and renewed as we make new friends and deepen friendship with our fellow travelers at Westminster.  ~See You Sunday

Padded Pews and Splinters of the Cross

I like padded pews, not that I get to sit in them since I’m the preacher.  But they provide a measure of comfort that seems legitimate given how hard it is at times to listen to a preacher.  You deserve a padded pew.  At the least though, a preacher ought to preach the Gospel in a way that makes the pad necessary and I don’t mean by that the kind  of hellfire and brimstone beating people in the name of Jesus sermons I heard growing up. I mean sermons that call us to the justice and peacemaking Gospel Jesus preached even before there was a crucifixion.

Speaking of which, we’re getting close to the Easter High Holy Sunday and as you know, you can’t really get to Resurrection Sunday without passing through Thursday and the Garden of Gethsemane, betrayal and Friday’s catastrophe of blood and shattered body that was the flogging and crucifixion.  But like padded pews, lots of folks–both liberal and conservative–try to pad the Gospel and reduce Jesus to an ethical teacher or a prosperity salesman.  It will be very important in the coming days and weeks as we approach Golgotha that we listen to the Christ and all he had to say about servant-ministry and sacrificial love.  Martin Luther King summed it up well when he said, ‘When I took up the cross I recognized it’s meaning. The cross is something that you bear, and ultimately, that you die on.’  We are all not called upon to give up our lives as King or Christ did, but we darn sure ought to get a splinter now and then from following the Crucified Lord.

Be awake. Be alert.  We are following Jesus to Jerusalem. We will sit in the upper room and commune with him.  And a time will come when we are tempted to betray him, to run from him, even before the rooster crows for the rising sun.  It is time to weigh our souls in the balance and find our way to a Holy place.  Easter is coming. First, however, there is a Thursday night of betrayal and a Friday noon of nails.