Tag Archives: Wharf church

Preachers lined up for summer

As Pastor Bledsoe is on sabbatical, the following preachers have agreed to step into the pulpit at Riverside. Please honor them by your presence. These two months will be a time for growing and embracing the transition in store for us since we now have some time for a “dress rehearsal” before we say goodbye to Pastor Bledsoe. Let’s pull together, take a deep breath and enjoy hearing from these faithful servants. Let us be faithful and not grow weary from doing well.

JUNE

2 Rev. Countess Cooper  Countess has known Pastor Bledsoe since she had him for World Religions at Howard Divinity in 1999. She also served as music director for our early service in 1999.  She earned her MDIV from Howard Divinity and is ordained in the UCC.  She can preach and sing. You can get a glimpse of that double gift in this video.

9 Rev. Roland Weah Associate Minister for over 12 years, Roland was a student of Pastor Bledsoe’s at Howard Divinity.  No stranger to Riverside, Roland has a pastor’s heart as he ministers to our shut-ins and visits the hospital. Roland will be overseeing services even though he is not preaching every service.

16 Rev. Jill McCrory Pastor of Twinbrook Baptist Church and a long-time colleague Jill is a DC native and graduate of the Leland Center Baptist Seminary in northern Virginia. Jill has been intensely involved in AWAB.  You can find a wonderful interview with her at the Metro Weekly site

23 Rev. Brian Hamilton Co-Pastor at Westminster Presbyterian Church with his wife, Ruth, Brian is not stranger to us. He and Westminster welcomed us with open arms during our interim journey.  A long time resident of SW and deeply committed to safeguarding the musical culture of Jazz and the Blues, we are honored to have Brian preach to us.

30 Dr. Jay-Paul Hinds. Jay-Paul has been a wonderful colleague at Howard University School of Divinity where he has been Assistant Professor of Pastoral Care, Practical Theology and Psychology of Religion. A graduate of Princeton and Emory, Dr. Hinds brings urgent insights into our complicated world and culture.

JULY

7 & 14 Father Martin Smith. Father Martin has preached once for us at Riverside and we found him to be charmingly provocative or perhaps he was provocatively charming. Either way, he delivers insights with power.  Martin is well known throughout the Episcopal Church as writer, spiritual director, retreat leader, and teacher exploring contemporary spirituality. A priest since 1971, he most recently served as the Senior Associate Rector at St Columba’s church in Washington, D.C., in the Diocese of Washington

21 Rev. Lawrence Rodgers A graduate of Howard University School of Divinity, Lawrence graduated at the top of his class, and with the following honors: The Biblical Scholarship Award in biblical and theological studies. The Donald Barton Prize for most likely to succeed in Pastoral Leadership, and the Delores Carpenter Award for “exemplifying the highest levels of academic achievement and embodying the commitment to do justice, love mercy, and walking humbly with God.” He is currently pastor of Westside Church of Christ in Baltimore.

28 Rev.  Phillip Huber Pastor Huber is the pastor of St. Matthew Lutheran Church here in SW.  He has just led his congregation through a development process that took a dozen years. He is a graduate of the Lutheran Theological Seminary in Gettysburg.  He has served a number of parishes and was Visiting Professor of Missiology and Cultural Anthropology at Tumaini University, Iringa, Tanzania.  Phillip also serves as Disaster Response Coordinator for Maryland and Delaware, Lutheran Disaster Response.

on the front porch

Last week I spent two afternoons in a row sitting out front of our church with a sign that says, “The Pastor Is In.” A couple of guys (rightly) pointed out that I was outside. I was thinking more along the lines of Lucy in the cartoon strip Peanuts. “I’m in” as, “I’m available.” I will occasionally sit outside with my sign and an extra chair. Feel free to drop by for a chat, tea, coffee, a vent or a prayer.

We are right in the middle of Lent which for me has meant composing sermons around the temptation narratives in the Gospels. But I’m moving along a plot line that includes Christ’s baptism, temptation, withdrawal to Galilee, departure from Nazareth, setting up in Capernaum and then calling disciples. This coming Sunday we will find ourselves on a hill (or mount) listening to the teaching of the Christ. If someone asked you what Jesus taught, well, you could not do better than to point them to Matthew chapters 5-7. We’ll begin with the Beatitudes.

Worship is about one hour long. We praise, pray and hear a sermon. In one hour folks. One hour in a week, give yourself to worship. Some will say that is not much time and they are correct. But have you ever watched a large rock thrown into a lake? Worship ripples over our lives, pulsing across the web of our interrelationships with themes of peace, justice, healing and repair. We’re easy to access by metro and bus. The Circulator, #52 and #54 buses drop right at our corner and the free Wharf shuttle picks up at L’Enfant and delivers you at the Wharf a block and a half from our church.

See you Sunday or on the “porch” sometime this week (likely Tuesday and Wednesday). ~PSTR

Church to dedicate new building

Sunday the 20th we dedicate our new church on MLK Sunday. Our previous building was built in 1967 and was to have its first service on April 7, 1968. Dr. King was assassinated on April 4 and the subsequent riots in DC postponed that first service. Now, 50 years later, on a national day of remembrance of his birth, we gather to dedicate our new church building. Terryn Nelson will be singing Patti Griffin’s MLK Song (Up to the Mountain). Dr. Michael Kinnamon will be preaching. And we will stand up! shoulder to shoulder to say The Beloved Community that gathers on the corner of 7th and Maine Ave in Washington DC is alive and vibrant and still speaking truth to power. Join us at 10 a.m. won’t you? Let us be the Beloved Community.

The Perversion of Our Republic

“For the human race is, more than any other species, at once social by nature and quarrelsome by perversion.”
 St. Augustine City of God

“If destruction be our lot, we must ourselves be its author and finisher. As a nation of freemen, we must live through all time, or die by suicide.”

―Abraham Lincoln, 28 years old, speaking in Springfield, Illinois

One year of the presidency of Donald Trump, chaos has been sown into our institutions like weeds into a field of wheat.  The State Department has been stripped like bark torn from a tree.  The Environmental Protection Agency and Energy Departments run by men who despise the very mission of those institutions.  The Supreme Court undermined by the majority leader who refused to hold hearings on President Obama’s choice until Donald Trump could appoint a darling of the right wing.  The sins of commission and omission are simply too numerous to mention. As I type this, the Republicans are undermining the impartial investigation into the Russian subterfuge of our election of a president, preferring instead to protect an authoritarian whose incompetence bewilders even the most jaded of commentators.  Mr. Ryan, armed with the philosophy of Aynd Rand (who believed altruism is destructive), is dead set on shredding not only The Affordable Care Act but Medicaid, Medicare and Social Security.  All but the 1% are at risk.

Our Republic is perverted. Its covenantal ties of citizenship severed, the talking heads spend their waking hours stoking hatred and division.  What do we do in the face of this perversion?

We live with dignity and justice. We covenant together in faith, hope and love and show up in worship to honor a Just God who expects justice. We take concrete steps like we will do next month as we dispense $25,000 in grants to agencies that heal, mend and work for justice (this will be the second time in two years that we have contributed such grants).  Next month, on President’s Day, several of us will join with seven other congregations of Jews, Muslims and Christians at Temple Micah to break bread together and worship together so we can state with courage and joy: E Pluribus Unum!

Be part of this.  Discover the power of worship in your life to set you free from fear. Step into courage and hope.   ~See you Sunday