The Politics of Good Friday

We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.

Martin Luther King Jr.

I often hear, “You shouldn’t politicize (this or that),” in reference to a number of things. More often than not, that sentiment comes from a place of privilege. It’s a privilege to experience various circumstances in life and not make political connections to real needs. Jesus is often invoked as someone who was politically neutral. When I hear this, it makes me chuckle a bit because it shows the person saying this hasn’t spent enough time reading the red letters in their Bible. Jesus was extremely subversive and political. Simply look at the Lord’s Prayer we recite each Sunday. When we pray, “Your kingdom come, Your will be done,” we pray a very political petition to God.

Good Friday is no less political. We recognize the injustice found in the killing of Jesus, an innocent person if there ever was one who was brutally executed. Yet, how often do we look at the criminal justice system that sentenced Jesus to death? Do we notice the poverty of Jesus and his family which prevented any sort of bribe being offered that would perhaps sway his release, or in today’s term he didn’t have the means to post bond? When we read the account of Jesus’ trial, we find Pilate declaring Jesus “not guilty” multiple times (Luke 23), and yet he was handed over to be crucified in what James Cone would describe as a lynching.

Though it may feel like long ago, it was just last month Nathaniel Woods, an African American from Alabama, was executed for a crime he did not commit. How do we know he was innocent? The person who committed the crime confessed multiple times that Nathaniel Woods had no role in the crime whatsoever. Nathaniel Woods is unfortunately the tip of the iceberg of such injustices. I’m sure many of us can recall the names of numerous men and women who were either wrongly convicted of crimes or worse, experienced in a single moment the horrifying effects of an antagonist acting as judge, jury, and executioner. I would be absolutely remiss if I didn’t acknowledge the prevalence of such injustices are often within African American communities.

And so Good Friday speaks to us today imploring and encouraging us to be watchful and steadfast in our pursuit of justice in all its forms (criminal, economic, healthcare, equality) for all our neighbors. Good Friday tells us God loves us unconditionally and is with us, truly with us in all aspects of our lives. God is with us as one who, at times, feels forsaken as Jesus did when he quoted Psalm 22 before his death. God is with us as the parent who lost their child, as the family member who lost their loved one. God is with us as the victim of oppression, power, and greed. God is with us as the person with insufficient funds struggling to make ends meet. God is with us as the one who enlists to sacrifice themselves for the sake of others. On Good Friday we see the political context of the crucifixion; on Good Friday we see God is with us and we are with God.

~Rev. Nick